Lecture Menu

The Initial Attack Line

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 2-4 hours

The initial attack line is the backbone of every fireground operation and will have a greater impact on the outcome of a fire than any other fireground operation. As the first line goes so does the fire – so we must get it right. What is your target flow rate? How do you determine your hoseline selection based on the buildings and conditions that you encounter? How do you estimate the stretch? All of these questions will be answered and discussed during this class. During this class, we will also discuss tactical decision making for fires in single family dwellings, multiple family dwellings, commercial and industrial buildings, and standpipe equipped buildings. As well as attic fires, cockloft fires, and basement fires.

Beds to Bundles: The Flexibility of Stretching Hoselines

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 2-8 hours

The initial attack line is the backbone of every fireground operation and will have a greater impact on the outcome of a fire than any other fireground operation. “As the first line goes so does the fire” - so we must get it right. In doing so, all other operations must support the initial attack line. This course focuses on multiple aspects of the hoseline operations including the target flow rate, attack package selection, and estimating the stretch. Will the second line be a backup line or a second attack line? What about the third line? What about alternate stretches like rope stretches and lines over ladders? During this course, we will discuss tactical decision making for fires in single family dwellings, multiple family dwellings, commercial and industrial buildings, as well as attic fires, cockloft fires, and basement fires. This class will also tackle the topic of standpipe systems and fires and standpipe equipped buildings.

First Due Decision Making: The Engine Company

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 2 hours

The first due engine company will set the tone for the entire fireground operation. Upon arriving on location the engine company is tasked with sizing up the fire building, taking the proper position, selecting the best entry point into the building, estimating the stretch, and selecting the correct hose line. All within a matter of seconds. All of these decisions will have a significant impact on the entire fireground operation. In this class we will discuss all of these topics as well as discuss tactical decision making for fires in single family dwellings, multi-family dwellings, commercial buildings, and standpipe equipped buildings. 

First Due Standpipe Operations

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 2 hours

Standpipe operations can be complex and for some firefighters a very rare operation. Yet, standpipe equipped buildings can be found in the response area of almost every fire department. Firefighters must understand how to effectively operate from standpipe systems, especially with the reduced staffing levels that are common in the fire service today. The standpipe system itself must be understood. Hoseline operations typically involve working with known knowns, but when operating from a standpipe system, the system itself introduces unknowns into the operational equation.  What size hoseline? Proper Staffing? Smoothbore or fog? Operate from the system or stretch from the street? Pump the FDC or let the fire pump supply the system? Dry stretch or charge the line in the stairwell? All of these questions will be answered during this class. We will also discuss pressure restricting devices and pressure reducing valves in detail including how to identify, adjust, and remove them if they are encountered.

Standpipe Operations for the Fire Service

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 4-8 hours

Standpipe operations can be complex and for some firefighters a very rare operation. Yet, standpipe equipped buildings can be found in the response area of almost every fire department. Firefighters must understand how to effectively operate from standpipe systems, especially with the reduced staffing levels that are common in the fire service today. In this class, we will discuss the standpipe system itself as well as the tactical decisions that must be made when operating from a standpipe system. This class will largely focus on attack package selection, hose line staffing, the identification of the different standpipe valves that may be encountered including pressure-reducing devices and valves, and the adjustment of these valves, as well as stretching, advancing, and operating hose lines from standpipe systems.

Proactive RIT: Improving Firefighter Rescue and Survival

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 2 hours

There is much more to a RIT operation than the rescue of a down firefighter. RIT operations should be proactive rather than reactive. Proactive RIT operations improve firefighter survival by improving the ability of a trapped firefighter to self-rescue as well as be rescued by firefighting crews that are already operating inside the structure. Proactive actions by the RIT team create a safer foreground for everybody, firefighter and civilian alike. This class will discuss proactive actions that can be taken by the RIT to improve survivability if a firefighter emergency does occur.

From the Fire Academy to the Fire Floor: Why the Disconnect

Instructor: Mickey Farrell

Length: 2-4 hours

Confronts a dilemma that has haunted the fire service for many decades. The old ”you’ll learn that in the firehouse,” mentality has set young motivated firefighters up for failure. Sadly, not every firefighter has the opportunity to be a part of an organization steeped in pride, tradition, and training. This class will begin to connect the dots not only for that lost firefighter trying to find his way, but the senior man looking for a rebirth into the job. 

Developing the Mindset of an Offensive Aerial Operator

Instructor: Nick Esposito

Length: 3-4 hours

Success or failure on the fire ground for a ladder company is often measured by how well an aerial operator initially positions the apparatus.  Ladder truck placement at an emergency scene is often the "make or break" moment for any operator.  The individual skills and abilities of the aerial apparatus operator can dictate how successful a truck company will be in achieving their goals at a fire scene.  Aerial apparatus are typically placed to allow members to work offensively in order to affect a rescue, gain entry to the upper floors of a structure, or to access the roof for vertical ventilation operations.  These concepts seem pretty simple and straight forward, but often we find that the actual execution at a fire scene can quickly become much more difficult.  This class aims to prepare aerial operators to be able to systematically approach an emergency scene in order to achieve an effective apparatus placement that will allow the ladder crew to make a positive impact on the outcome of any emergency.

Leading with Purpose

Instructor: Anthony Rowett

Length: 1-4 hours

Leadership comes with a great amount of responsibility. This responsibility must not be taken lightly. Passion and purpose are strong character traits that lend themselves to strong leadership. In this class, we will focus on how to use that passion and purpose to guide your leadership principles.

The Engine: Road Show

Instructors: Anthony Rowett, Jonathon Brumley, and Kyle Romagus

Length: 8 hours

This class is an 8 hour lecture series presented by 3 instructors. Each instructor will present a separate class on engine company operations. The lectures included in the class are First Due Decision Making: The Engine Company - presented by Anthony Rowett, Bringing the Medium Diameter Hoseline Back to the Mainstream - presented by Jonathon Brumley, and Cruel Intentions - presented by Kyle Romagus. 

Breaking Barriers: Disabilities Training for First Responders

Instructor: Todd Edwards

Length: 1.5-3 hours

This 90 minute – 3-hour training program provides all first responders an in-depth look at serving the intellectual disabilities communities, with a focus on Down Syndrome and Autism. The class includes recognition, understanding, communication tips, search and rescue concerns, and how to manage special needs patients and victims.

Command & Control for Maritime Emergencies

Instructor: Ken Keller

Length: 4 - 32 hours

Maritime emergencies create significant hazards and unique challenges for the emergency personnel who respond to these low-probability / high-risk events. A fire aboard a cruise ship vessel or a release of product from a 500,000-gallon oil-tanker vessel can quickly overwhelm even the most seasoned emergency responder. Large and complex maritime emergencies will require multi-agency responses from local, state, and federal levels. There is a need for emergency responders to have a working knowledge of the many hazards that exist in the maritime environment and the resources available to help mitigate these types of emergencies. Utilizing the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standard 1005 (Professional Qualifications for Marine Firefighting for Land-Based Fire Fighters) and NFPA standard 1405 (Guide for Land-Based Fire Departments that Respond to Marine Vessel Fires), this course is designed to help the student gain valuable knowledge of the maritime environment to include: vessel types, vessel hazards, vessel construction and cargo, organizational roles and responsibilities, strategy and tactics, and incident response considerations. Using classroom instruction and hands-on practical exercises the student will gain a better understanding of the maritime domain, emergency response resources that exist, and initial emergency response action considerations for land-based firefighters.